FIBRE CONSUMPTION PER DAY

FIBRE CONSUMPTION PER DAY [2018 Update]

FIBRE CONSUMPTION PER DAY

Fibre is an important part of a healthy diet. The problem starts when a person consumes too much of fibre in a short time, which causes digestive issues. Fibre is also known as the magic weight loss ingredient. Fibre does not have any calories.

High fibre foods are a part of a healthy weight loss diet and completing the daily recommended intake of fibre provides many health benefits.

WHAT IS FIBRE?

Fibre comes from plants. It is the portion of plants that cannot be digested by the human digestive tract. So technically speaking our bodies cannot digest fibre but it still is beneficial for our bodies in a variety of ways and is also important element to maintain good health.

According to the National Institutes of Health's Food and Nutrition Board, women under 50 needs to consume about 25 grams of fibre per day.

It is classified into two categories: -

  • SOLUBLE FIBRE
  • INSOLUBLE FIBRE

SOLUBLE FIBRE

Soluble fibre dissolves in water and slows the process of digestion which prolongs the feeling of fullness. Sources of Soluble Fibre includes Oats, peas, beans, lentils, apples, sweet potatoes, carrots, flax seeds, chia seeds. Inulin, gums, pectin and beta-glucan are some other sources of soluble fibre.

INSOLUBLE FIBRE

Insoluble Fibre does not dissolve in water and it promotes regular bowel movement.

Dietary sources of insoluble fibre are skin of fruits, broccoli, cauliflower, green leafy vegetables like kale, lettuce, spinach, etc. green beans, cabbage, cucumber, celery, onions, garlic, tomatoes, zucchini, nuts, pumpkin seeds and sesame seed. Gluten containing grains such as whole wheat and couscous also contain insoluble fibre.

There are also some gluten free options for insoluble fibre such as quinoa and brown rice.

HOW MUCH OF FIBRE PER DAY?

On average many women do not consume the recommended dosage of fibre each day. According to American Heart Association the daily recommended amount of fibre intake is 25 gms per day in a 2000 calorie diet for adult females. Mentioned below are the recommended dosage according to the age group in females.

  • Females >18 years old: 25g fibre
  • Pregnant Females aged 14-18: 25 g fibre
  • Pregnant Females aged 19-30: 28 g fibre
  • Pregnant Females aged 31-50 28 g fibre
  • Lactating Females aged 14-18: 27 g fibre
  • Lactating Females aged 19-30: 30 g fibre
  • Lactating Females aged 31-50: 30 g fibre
  • Children aged 4-8: 18g of fibre
  • Girls aged 9-13: 20g of fibre
  • Girls aged 14-18: 22g of fibre

SYMPTOMS OF TOO MUCH FIBRE INTAKE

Fibre is also known as “bulk” or “roughage” and its said to make the same noise as it passes through the consumers stomach and intestines. If you are consuming more than the recommended dosage of fibre per day reaching about 70 gms your body will start showing you symptoms. Mentioned below are the signs and symptoms.

  • Gas
  • Bloating
  • Constipation
  • Diarrhea
  • Abdominal cramping

Fibre can also bind the important minerals and stop the body from getting nutrients from Calcium, Iron and Zinc.

DAILY SERVING OF FIBRE

Mentioned below is an example of how an adult female can consume fibre and easily reach their daily dietary needs of fibre.

  • ¾ Cup whole grain breakfast cereal (such as low-sugar muesli)
  • 2 slices whole meal or whole grain bread
  • 1 apple (with skin) and 1 orange
  • 2 cups mixed raw vegetables
  • ¼ cup legumes (e.g. Baked beans)

The total fibre content of the above foods is 27.5 grams.

When the fibre intake is increased remember to drink more water as fibre absorbs water.

WHAT ARE THE SIDE EFFECTS OF NOT CONSUMING ENOUGH FIBRE?

When a woman does not consume enough insoluble fibre, it can lead her to gastrointestinal problems which includes constipation, irritable bowel syndrome, diverticular disease, hemorrhoids and bowel cancer.

BENEFITS OF FIBRE INTAKE

Fibre being the essential part of a healthy diet has many benefits which includes: -

  • Improving digestive health
  • Preventing constipation
  • Reducing the risk of heart disease
  • Reducing the risk of type 2 diabetes
  • Reducing the risk of colon cancer
  • Reducing low-density lipoprotein (ldl) levels, which is "bad" cholesterol
  • Improving the glycemic index (gi) in individuals with diabetes
  • Increasing satiety or feeling fuller for longer

FOOD HIGH IN FIBRE

Many plant-based foods are high in fibre which includes

  • Wholegrain, whole meal and/or high-fibre varieties of grain-based foods like bread and pasta
  • Whole grains, such as rice, oats, quinoa, barley, polenta and buckwheat
  • Fruit and vegetables
  • Legumes
  • Nuts and seeds

Often fibre is removed from the plants foods we eat like fruits and vegetable skins or bran seeds, when the food is cooked at home or processed by the manufacturer. More fibre is obtained when fruits and vegetables are consumed with their skin.

FIBRE SUPPLEMENTS

If a woman is not able to fulfill her fibre needs with her diet she can also have fibre supplements. These supplements are also used to normalize constipation and diarrhea. A woman should increase her fluid intake if she is planning to add fibre in her diet to prevent constipation and other issues.

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